About the Book

Are you a parent tired of the persistent belief that your child’s moral values, ethical principles, and ability to distinguish between what is right and wrong must come from religion? Do you wonder how you can ever teach your child to think for herself in a culture that values uncritical obedience over critical consideration? Or do you fear what the future holds for your child in a society that views unquestioned faith as a virtue and a questioning mind with suspicion? If so, as author and father Richard A. Conn, Jr. argues, the solution is clear, and it rests not only with you—but with all parents who have similar concerns. In this volume, he demonstrates why all parents who value science and reason can help stop the centuries-old practice of religious indoctrination and offers advice on how to encourage children to discover the world and their place in it for themselves. Only by allowing them to learn that we are in this world together, that we have a limited time to live, and that we have only one another on which to rely, can we truly enable them to flourish and begin to build a just and peaceful world—not just for their generation but for all future generations.

About the Author


ISBN: 9781634311625 (paperback)

SRP: $14.95

Page count: 152 pages

Trim size: 5.5 x 8.5

Pub date: May 2018

Ebook availability: Yes

Audiobook availability: Forthcoming

Richard A. Conn, Jr. is an international lawyer and private investment fund manager. He has advised governments on legal restructuring, has delivered a keynote to the United Nations, and is involved in various not-for-profit activities, including one that has taught chess to 1.2 million U.S. public school students. He has four children and lives near New York City.

“In a period of religious extremism Richard Conn provides practical advice about how to raise children without religious dogma, as thoughtful, responsible, creative individuals.”

—George Soros, philanthropist and author

"A remarkable book I wish I had read thirty years ago. A convincing and beautiful guide to nonreligious parenting.”

—Henrik Carlsen, father of world chess champion Magnus Carlsen